Loose-Fill Asbestos Testing
  Take A Minute To Learn About Loose-fill Asbestos Insulation
 

      
     How dangerous is airborne asbestos? You probably have it and do even know the risks. LFAI
(loose-fill asbestos insulation) poses health hazards to residents of a building that has toxic airborne
particles. It is a form of insulation material, which typically consists of raw, finely pulverized asbestos.

Various HVAC products, for example, your furnace, flooring, wall cavities, ceiling, attic roofing, and
so forth, feature LFAI fibers. What makes it difficult to handle is the fact that LFAI materials do not
have any form of protective filter. Why use LFAI products if it poses such a high safety risk? It is safe
to use it for its intended purpose with precautions in mind.

 

Loose-fill Asbestos Insulation Moving Particles

 

     Even if you do not disturb LFAI, it will shed loose fibers and dust over time. Airborne asbestos
moves around easily when it is airborne and can pollute different sections of your building. It can
impair your sight and cause breathing problems if you inhale the air. Long-term exposure to it can
compromise your respiratory organs, and in extreme cases, cause the life-threatening disease,
asbestosis.

 

How To Fix Loose-fill Asbestos Insulation?

 

     If your building tests positive for LFAI substances, you should not delay remediation. You should
get help immediately from a certified asbestos abatement team. These specialists will remove traces
of asbestos and replace insulation materials where needed. How your LFAI remediation team
approaches removal/reconditioning depends on several factors, including location, construction design,
and so on. You should also notify your neighbors about any scheduled asbestos remedial work and
renovations that

will take place in your building. It is a necessary precaution to ensure everyone is safe.

For more, see loose-fill asbestos testing.

 
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